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05

Feb

a portrait is a painting with something a little wrong with the mouth.
john singer sargent

14

Dec

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 


Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner.

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner.

(Source: that-darned-sock)

13

Dec

wilwheaton:

(via Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal)

09

Dec

Yule Log 2.0 - Happy Holidays

this is super cool

amazing display of graffiti work.  worth your 5 minutes.

10

Nov

artmonia:

Anna Armona

Watercolor, A4

29

Oct

wnycradiolab:

devidsketchbook:

FLOWER SCULPTURES PARADE IN ZUNDERT, NETHERLANDS

Bloemencorso, the annual parade of flowers in Zundert. Despite the relatively small nature of Zundert (a small town with a population of about 20,000) the variety of and ingenuity of these sculptures seems to know no bounds. [via thisiscolossal]

Hot damn.

These are amazing!

21

Oct

People ask why I want to have an exhibition in the streets, but have you been to an art gallery recently? They’re full.

04

Oct

Gabriel Dawe site specific colorful installations seem like fragmented rays of light frozen in space

(Source: from89)

28

Aug

archiemcphee:

For an ongoing series entitled Out of the Bowl, Cambria, California-based designer Thad Markham creates awesome sculptures depicting vibrantly-coloured pieces of anthropomorphic fruit that have snuck out of their bowls, bags, and crisper drawers to have a bit of fun. Some of them dance, wrestle or spar with each other, others mediate, and some simply lounge about holding hands.

"It all started with the bananas. One bright sunny morning he was sitting at breakfast and his glance fell on a bunch of bananas on the table. “That’s funny,” he said to himself, “it almost looks like they’re dancing.” Thus began his preoccupation with the secret lives of fruits and vegetables…he began haunting the produce department of the grocery store, his mind captivated with a single burning question… What do the fruits and vegetables do at night when no one is watching?"

Visit Thad Markham’s website to view more playful pieces from the Out of the Bowl series.

[via Sweet Station]

06

Aug

i would love to do something like this, but less gritty/dirty, more glam/chic.

(Source: unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream)

02

Aug

archiemcphee:

Have you ever seen a more melancholy pile of pasta? Entitled Le Solitaire, this surprisingly emotive sculpture of an enormous anthropomorphic heap of noodles slumped on a little chair is the work of French sculptor Theo Mercier. In 2010 it was exhibited at the Musée d’Art Moderne in Paris.

In reality, the surreal figure is nothing more than a pile of silicone coated cords. Using two large, blue eyes and an intentional body gesture, Mercier has created a sense of vulnerability, saying that this sculpture is “The one who is showed, who is watched, he is unique and alone because he is a monster. It tells a lot about the idea of exposure.”

We hope at least one brave person went up and gave this awesome sculpture a great big hug, because we sure want to. Sometimes even noodles need a little love and reassurance.

Click here to view more of Theo Mercier’s fascinating artwork

[via My Modern Metropolis]

08

Jul

supersonicelectronic:

Saturday Safari: Nick Brandt.

For this week’s Saturday Safari I’ve chosen Nick Brandt.  Nick’s photography is immediate and passionate.  It resolves a sense of awe to the viewer and also imparts a sense of urgency over the protection of wildlife habitats.  Check out more of Brandt’s work:

Read More

fer1972:

Steel Cityscape Sculpture by Hu Shaoming

so cool

05

Jul